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  1. Maximum Pillar 3a amount for 2023

    Maximum Pillar 3a amount for 2023 

    The maximum Pillar 3a amounts for 2023 have been announced. Get the information you need and start planning for tomorrow with Pillar 3a.

  2. Pension provision in a registered partnership

    Security for your life partner. What same-sex couples need to know.

    Under a registered partnership, same-sex couples can live together and take responsibility for one another if they remain in a registered partnership after July 1, 2022. But what would happen if one partner dies or is no longer able to work due to illness? Read about the benefits for registered partners from your pension plan in the event of disability or death.

  3. Closing pension gaps. Swiss pension system

    Identifying, avoiding, and closing pension gaps early on

    If a pension is not large enough to cover a person's normal expenses, this is known as a pension gap. What are the potential causes of such a gap and what options does the Swiss pension system provide for avoiding or closing them at an early stage?

  4. Switzerland's 3-pillar model

    Pension savings in Switzerland. The three-pillar principle explained in simple terms.

    The Swiss pension system, also known as the three-pillar principle, consists of three pillars. . The public pension scheme (AVS), the occupational pension scheme (LPP) and the individual pension scheme (pillar 3a/b) together form the solid framework for comprehensive pension savings. Pension savings in Switzerland explained simply.

  5. Old Age and Survivors' Insurance (AHV) contributions: employers, employees, self-employed people

    AHV contributions from gainfully employed persons: Contribution rates and payment obligation.

    For gainfully employed and self-employed persons, the AHV contribution requirement starts from January 1 after reaching the age of 18. As of January 1, 2021, the contribution rates for gainfully employed persons changed: AHV contribution 8.7%; IV 1.4%; EO 0.5%. Half is paid by the employee and half by the employer; self-employed persons must pay the full amount by themselves.

  6. AHV contributions for unemployed persons

    AHV contributions: How much do unemployed persons pay?

    Unemployed persons are still required to pay AHV contributions. The amount they pay is determined by their assets and any pension income. The minimum AHV contribution is currently CHF 503 per year. Who exactly is considered to be unemployed and how are AHV contributions for married couples calculated?

  7. Pillar 3a: Start early and consistently make deposits

    Paying into Pillar 3a is worthwhile. Even bit by bit.

    Maintain the standard of living you're accustomed to even after retirement with Pillar 3a. It's possible, if you take account of all the contributory factors. Deciding factors not only include the interest or return level, but above all, how long and how regularly deposits are made.

  8. Security for your spouse: What can your family depend on in an emergency?

    Financial stability when it matters most. Security for your children and spouse.

    How can I protect my children and spouse if anything happens to me? It's an important question that married couples must consider. Learn about the benefits paid by your pension in the event of disability, and how a widower's/widow's pension and survivors' pension guarantee financial stability for your family in the event of your death. 

  9. Pension Provision for Cohabiting Couples

    Providing financial protection for a cohabiting partner: Special rules apply in the case of cohabitation.

    Financial security for disability or death is particularly important in the case of cohabitation because the law does not provide a safety net for your partner. Read here how you can protect your cohabiting partner and what benefits are available to cohabiting partners under the AHV and pension fund

  10. Disability: Disability pension offsets lost earnings

    What are singles entitled to in the event of disability?

    Are you financially secure if you fall ill and can no longer work? It's an important question that singles should ask themselves. When are you entitled to a disability pension if you are unable to work, and who would receive benefits from the AHV and pension fund in the event of your death?