Switzerland Pension Fund

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  1. Seven proposals for dealing with falling pensions

    Pensions are falling: seven suggestions for your private pension provision

    Low interest rates, increasing life expectancy, and falling conversion rates – future generations will have to expect lower pensions. Private pension provision is becoming more important. We have put together seven suggestions that will help you to live as worry-free as possible in your retirement.

  2. Suggestions for BVG reform: How they will affect our pensions

    According to the latest study by Credit Suisse, the pensions of the coming generations will be significantly lower than current pensions if nothing is done. Social partners are in the process of discussing possible reforms. This overview study assesses the reform proposals and calculates the monetary impact of the individual solutions.

  3. Second pillar: Falling pensions for future generations

    Pensions for future generations are falling sharply

    Lower returns and falling conversion rates – the current labor force can expect lower pensions. The latest study from Credit Suisse calculates how great the differences could actually be as well as who will have to face the heaviest losses.

  4. Credit Suisse pension fund study 2019: Pensions to fall sharply for future generations

    Credit Suisse publishes study on employee benefits insurance in Switzerland

  5. The future of retirement provision

    The future of retirement provision

    The Swiss retirement provision system will face several challenges in the coming years. Jan Schüpbach explains in the video what new solutions in the area of Pillar 3a savings could work for the majority.

  6. Splitting the AHV, pension fund, and Pillar 3a upon divorce

    What happens to your AHV (Old Age and Survivors' Insurance), pension fund, and Pillar 3a if you get divorced?

    In the event of a divorce, the same principle applies to AHV, pension fund and Pillar 3a assets, namely that entitlements and assets earned during the marriage are divided up. However, this is done differently from pillar to pillar. 

  7. Women need to be careful about their retirement provision when working part-time or on a career break

    Women: Think about your retirement provision if working part-time work or taking a career break

    Part-time work and employment interruptions are key reasons why women invest less in Pillar 3a, according to a new study by Credit Suisse. However, it is particularly important for them to increase their exposure to this pillar in order to compensate for the loss of the AHV and BVG pension due to reduced contributions.

  8. Employee benefits insurance in the case of multiple jobs. What you need to know.

    Multiple jobs: What you need to know about your pension fund 

    These days, many employees work part time for several employers. This means that, despite regular income, they don't earn enough to fall directly under statutory BVG insurance. Nonetheless, they too should provide for their retirement. What solutions are available for this with employee benefits insurance? 

  9. This is what single moms can do for their retirement provision

    Retirement provision for single moms: Four tips so that you can lead a self-determined life in retirement

    Women with children are aware of the importance of saving for their retirement. This is shown by a recent Credit Suisse study. But less than half of single women with children pay regularly into Pillar 3a – probably due in part to being on a tight budget – with correspondingly negative consequences for their retirement provision. We provide four tips on how you can provide for more financial independence in your old age.

  10. Lower salaries and part-time work prevent women from paying into Pillar 3a

    Women would pay more into pillar 3a – if they could

    Lower incomes and more part-time employment are the main reasons that women pay into Pillar 3a less frequently than men. A current Credit Suisse study shows that, all things being equal, women would pay more into their private pension provision than men.