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Panel Discussion: "Building the Future: The Role of Architecture in China's Great Transformation"

Video only available in English

During the Credit Suisse-sponsored exhibition "Chinese Whispers. Recent Art from the Sigg and M+ Sigg Collections," a panel discussion was held on April 27, 2016, at the Zentrum Paul Klee in Bern as part of the series of talks entitled "Chinese Challenges." The panel included artist Ai Weiwei, architect Jacques Herzog, collector Uli Sigg, and was moderated by Martin Meyer (Neue Zürcher Zeitung).

The fully packed auditorium at the Zentrum Paul Klee (ZPK) was the scene of an exciting panel discussion at the end of April. It was part of the supporting program for the exhibition "Chinese Whispers," part of which could be viewed at the Kunstmuseum Bern, with the rest on display at the ZPK. While the exhibition at the ZPK is already over, the one at the Kunstmuseum Bern has been extended until September 25, 2016, thanks to the large number of visitors it attracted. By June 19 alone, over 100,000 people had viewed the exhibit.

The "Chinese Whispers" exhibit and the "Chinese Challenges" talks, cosponsored by the Asia Society and the Swiss Institute of International Studies (SIAF), offered the public a program with complex insights into Chinese art and culture, as well as the current challenges being faced by the country. The panel discussion, titled "Building the Future: The Role of Architecture in China's Great Transformation," featured some big names, and the fact that Ai Weiwei, Jacques Herzog, and Uli Sigg have known each other for years led to a very open and relaxed conversational atmosphere.

Credit Suisse has maintained a partnership with the Kunstmuseum Bern for 20 years now. Their collaboration has repeatedly set the tone for fascinating discussions. For the time being, the Chinese Whispers exhibit and the 2012 decision by Uli Sigg to donate a large portion of his collection to the M+ in Hong Kong marks the end of the Chinese Window that the Kunstmuseum has established over the past several years with its exhibits showing works from the Sigg collection.